Margaret Court Is Back With More Homophobia, Says ‘Tennis Is Full Of Lesbians’

Tennis legend Margaret Court just made another unforced error.

The 74-year-old Australian said Wednesday that her sport is ?full of lesbians? and even referenced Adolf Hitler in discussing how how young minds are being influenced.

Court, who has won a record 24 Grand Slam single titles, made the remarks after recently declaring she refused to fly Qantas because the airline supports same-sex marriage.

Her latest anti-LGBTQ volley will raise plenty of eyebrows as well.

?I mean, tennis is full of lesbians, because even when I was playing there was only a couple there, but those couple that led took young ones into parties and things,? she said on Vision Christian Radio, per The Guardian. ?And because they liked to be around heroes and what you get at the top is often what you will get right through that sport.?

?We?re there to help them overcome,? she added. ?We?re not against the people.?

The interview got weirder when Court commented on transgender children. 

?God?s got so much in [the Bible] about the mind, how it affects us, affects our emotions, our feelings,? Court, now a Christian pastor, said, according to CNN. ?You can think ?Oh, I?m a boy? and it?ll affect your emotions and feelings, and everything else and so that?s all the devil. That?s what Hitler did. That?s what Communism did ? got the minds of the children. And it?s a whole plot in our nation and in the nations of the world to get the minds of the children.?

Tennis greats Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova, who are both gay, have already called for Court?s name to be removed from the stadium that bears her name at the Australian Open in Melbourne.

Current stars Andy Murray and Samantha Stosur, who is Australia?s top women?s player, have also spoken out against her remarks.

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The 5 Hot Takes You Need To Unpack Trump’s ‘Covfefe’ Tweet

Many people have have been doing their best code-cracking impression of ?The Imitation Game? ever since President Donald Trump tweeted about ?negative press covfefe? early Wednesday morning. Seriously, what does it mean?

Typo? Probably. Nuclear code?! Hopefully not.

Here?s how it all started:

Fortunately, commentators across the media sphere were ready to sort it out. Here are five hot ?covfefe? takes to help you through the confusion.

  • CNN?s Chris Cillizza quickly asserted that ??covfefe? tells you all you need to know about Donald Trump.? He says that the President?s ?lack of discipline reveals that there is simply no one who can tell Trump ?no.? Or at least no one whom he will listen to.?

  • The New York Times took a more cerebral approach, pondering with every passing moment just how long the tweet would avoid deletion. One does wonder: ?Had the president?s lawyers, so eager to curb his stream-of-consciousness missives, tackled the commander in chief under the cover of night??

  • Like many outlets, and bookish people generally, USA Today headed over to the old dictionary. Rookie mistake, of course. Merriam-Webster, although snarky as always, just doesn?t have the answer.

  • Naturally, folks on Twitter jumped on ?covfefe? like it was the last typo the internet would ever know. Here at HuffPost, we rounded up the finest quips from people just trying to make sense of it all.

  • And, finally, New York Magazine?s Daily Intelligencer blog found those loyal Trump supporters who know that ??Covfefe? Is Just Another Way He?s Making America Great Again.? Very impressive, if true.

In summary, nobody knows. Except for, just maybe, one man:

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United May Get Fined $435,000 For Operating Plane That Wasn’t ‘Airworthy’

United Airlines seriously can?t catch a break. 

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday proposed fining United $435,000 for operating 23 flights in 2014 with a Boeing 787 that the government alleged was not in airworthy condition. The news comes about seven weeks after the fateful incident in which officers dragged a passenger off a plane when he refused to give up his seat for a United employee.

The FAA alleged that back in June 2014, United mechanics replaced a fuel pump pressure switch on the Boeing aircraft but failed to perform a required inspection before returning the aircraft to service. A United spokesman said, ?The safety of our customers and employees is our top priority. We immediately took action after identifying the issue and are working closely with the FAA in their review.?

United has faced public backlash in the wake of April?s incident, which was followed by more public relations fiascos including the death of a large rabbit on a United flight. Last week, a gay dad said he planned to sue the airline after a flight attendant allegedly accused him of molesting his son.

Reuters contributed to this report.

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Big Snake Regurgitating Live Rival Serpent Will Take You To A Dark Place

Snakes alive!

Viral video of a big snake regurgitating another serpent that?s still alive might be one of the creepiest, WTF reptile moments caught on camera. It?s seriously… eek!

Christopher Reynolds filmed the predator and its fully swallowed prey under some leaves in Newton, Texas, National Geographic reported Monday.

Reynolds guessed that his presence might have scared the black snake from fully digesting its meal, the magazine noted. He said it was the slithery victim?s ?super, ultra, lottery-lucky day.?

But for anyone who watches this, it might not be your lucky day if you?re about to eat.

In the YouTube video Reynolds posted Saturday, he wrote that he caught the spectacle while driving home from his mother?s with his wife, Nina. She suggested he film it.

?I am happy I did,? he said.

 h/t Digg

 

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Sofia Coppola Becomes Second Woman To Win Cannes Film Festival’s Directing Prize

Ending a 56-year gap, Sofia Coppola became the second woman to receive the Best Director award at the Cannes Film Festival as the gala wrapped up on Sunday.

Russian Yuliya Solntseva won for ?The Story of the Flaming Years? in 1961. Coppola was honored for ?The Beguiled,? a Southern Gothic horror that updates the 1971 Civil War drama starring Clint Eastwood. Three of the director?s previous features ? ?The Virgin Suicides,? ?Marie Antoinette? and ?The Bling Ring? ? also competed at Cannes.

?I was thrilled to get this movie made and it?s such an exciting start to be honored in Cannes,? Coppola said in a statement.

Along with praising ?my great team and cast,? she thanked Universal Studios and one of its speciality divisions, Focus Features, ?for their support of women-driven films.?

Nicole Kidman, a star of ?The Beguiled? and three other Cannes selections, received a special prize marking the French festival?s 70th anniversary.

The coveted Palme d?Or, one of filmmaking?s most lauded honors, went to ?The Square,? a surprising choice for a festival that typically favors intense dramas. ?The Square? is a farce about an art museum staging a radical exhibition that sparks a social crisis. 

Pedro Almódovar, the acclaimed director of ?Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown? and ?Talk to Her,? headed this year?s jury, which also included Will Smith, Jessica Chastain, Chinese actress Fan Bingbing, South Korean director Park Chan-wook and Italian director Paolo Sorrentino.

Here?s the full list of winners. Many of the hits at Cannes factor into the Oscar race.

Palme d?Or: ?The Square,? a Swedish art-world satire directed by Ruben Östlund

Grand Prix: ?120 Beats Per Minute,? an AIDS drama directed by Robin Campillo

Jury Prize: ?Loveless,? a Russian missing-child drama directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev

Best Actress: Diane Kruger, ?In the Fade?

Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, ?You Were Never Really Here?

Best Director: Sofia Coppola, ?The Beguiled? 

Best Screenplay: a tie between ?You Were Never Really Here? (written by Lynne Ramsay) and ?The Killing of a Sacred Deer? (written by Yorgos Lanthimos and Efthymis Filippou)

Camera d?Or, honoring the best debut feature: ?Jeune Femme,? directed by Léonor Sérraille 

Best Short Film: ?A Gentle Night,? directed by Qiu Yang

70th Anniversary Prize: Nicole Kidman, who starred in four Cannes titles (?The Beguiled,? ?The Killing of a Sacred Deer,? ?How to Talk to Girls at Parties? and ?Top of the Lake: China Girl?)

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Director John Scheinfeld On The Spiritual Journey Of Jazz Icon John Coltrane

In this week?s episode of ?Scheer Intelligence? Robert Scheer speaks with documentarian John Scheinfeld about his latest film, ?Chasing Trane? about jazz icon John Coltrane. The two also discuss Scheinfeld?s earlier film, ?The U.S. vs. John Lennon,? and Lennon?s political activism during the Vietnam War.

The conversation begins with a look at the parallels between Lennon and Coltrane. Noting that the two music legends ?overlapped in time,? Scheer tells Scheinfeld: ?What you capture in both stories is a search for integrity and rebellion.?

After delving into Lennon?s political activism during and after the Vietnam War, the two discuss Coltrane?s legacy. Scheinfeld notes that Coltrane was a ?practice nut? who would practice ?hours and hours every day.?

?Yes, jazz exists today, but it?s not the same thing,? Scheer says.

Scheinfeld explains Coltrane?s background and musical process, and the two agree that his music defied any genre.

?He seemed to always be learning and seeking the truth,? Scheinfeld says. ?I didn?t want to make a jazz film. In fact, I think the word ?jazz? appears in ?Chasing Trane? maybe five times. This is a journey film … it?s a portrait of this remarkable artist.?

Listen to the full conversation and listen to past editions of ?Scheer Intelligence? here.

? Adapted from Truthdig.com

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